La Sombra Del Viento Epub

I read the opening few pages and instantly knew 3 things:1. I was going to love this book.2. I needed a whole pad of post-its to mark quotes.3. I wanted to read this in Spanish for the rich poetry the language would add.A young boy Daniel is taken by his father to the Cemetery of Forgotten Books and told to salvage a book which he must take stewardship over.

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He choses a novel—or maybe it chose him—that touches him, stirs his desire for literature, and forever entangles him with the fate of the b I read the opening few pages and instantly knew 3 things:1. I was going to love this book.2.

I needed a whole pad of post-its to mark quotes.3. I wanted to read this in Spanish for the rich poetry the language would add.A young boy Daniel is taken by his father to the Cemetery of Forgotten Books and told to salvage a book which he must take stewardship over. He choses a novel—or maybe it chose him—that touches him, stirs his desire for literature, and forever entangles him with the fate of the book and its author. The strange author died in poverty but now someone is seeking out all remaining copies of his unsuccessful novels to burn. Daniel embarks on a mission to solve the mystery of the author's story being watched by a revengeful cop and the book burner himself.

As the story twists and slowly unravels he doesn't know whose account to trust or how it will affect his life.Wrapped up in the mystery is a message of death: do we live a full life or wander through it numb? The Shadow of the Wind is an allegory for death in a fictitious novel by the same title. Shadow is a perfect symbol for death evoking images of how death can be metaphorical instead of literal—living shadows of lives, chasing shadows of dreams, being shadows of others, letting memories shadow life. Every character had shadows which could engulf them or they could overcome. In this sense death becomes a fate we chose ourselves. For death is not always the worst thing that can happen ('words are not always the worst prison'). Every time the word shadow was used I considered its illusion of death.

It was with much thought that the word was scattered throughout the book.SpoilersJust as the fictitious novel was an echo of the book and Julian's life, I loved watching Daniel's life parallel Julian's. Both grew up poor without an ideal family life, fell in love with a rich girl who was the adoration of her father and whose brother was a best friend, evoked murderous anger from her father after impregnating her, and when they have a brush with death, extremes of hate and love anchored their fight to survive.

As Julian's story unfolds, Daniel unwittingly finds himself in the exact same point of their duel destiny.Once Daniel is aware of the correlation, the comparison stops. Is it because Daniel consciously chooses to chance his path or has fate dealt him a better hand? Julian wrote 'There are no coincidences. We are the puppets of our subconscious desires.' But while the message is clear that we chose our own fate, it seems there was no fate but failure for Julian. The sad thing is I believed Julian's love for Penelope as it grew in obsession more than Daniel's love for Beatriz which seemed a happy chance of lust.Themes of devils and angels are prevalent as characters save and ruin each others' lives. Clara is a physical angel who is blind while Fumero an emotional devil blinded by hate.

While women tended to be described as angel and men devil, most characters held both in different shades. Take Julian the angel child bringing life (love, novels) who turned into the devil Lain Coubert bringing death (destruction, fear). But the characters pick whether to accept the destiny allotted them. Fermin was living death in the shadows of the street who had to get over his demons to find life worth living. The shadows for Nuria, Julian, Fortuny, even Fumero didn't have to give them a reason to quit living. They chose shadows.The book reminded me of The 13th Tale thematically, linguistically, and in delivery, although I loved this book so much more.

The way the mystery unfolds finding tidbits from different perspectives enhanced the mystery and aided the depth of characterization. When I can see the vicious wife beater, deceived husband, and regretful father all in Antonio Fortuny I get a more well rounded sense of his motives. I enjoyed how the characters played different roles for each other.I love Barcelona as the setting. If you've been to the artistically enchanting city, you know it's the perfect backdrop to this eloquently enchanting tale with a gothic feel. The Spanish have a way of making all things metaphorically beautiful. The vivid romantic passages had me smiling and at times laughing out loud. I highly enjoyed the writing and it wasn't until two-thirds of the way into the book that the story finally stole my complete attention.

Julian was my initial guess and while the story kept me questioning, it was the best solution and I was happy with the conclusion.But no novel is perfect; my issues are these:1. The readymade quotes are extreme. Zafon salvages this by calling himself out on the commentary. He sets the comments up in dialogue and then uses another character to mock the snippets.2. Perspective, particularly in Nuria's letter, is off. How could she know what Miquel looked at when dying?

The chapters of her letters change from direct commentary to Daniel to third-party narrative. Elsewhere in the novel Daniel summarizes conversations in italics but I wondered from whence the interruption of her narrative with Fumero's story came.3. I always hope historical fiction will showcase a more accurate moral setting, but it rarely happens. While I believed the sex about Zafon's characters, done in secret and with fathers chasing down the culprits, how could they find out they were pregnant the next day? I was also disappointed that all marriages were displayed as wrong and wives disregarded. I guess it added to the Spanish flavor of the book.4.

American authors tend to impose unrealistic happy endings while Europeans favor poignant sad ones. At one point it seemed bad things happened to Julian for nothing else than this love of tragedies. It seemed Zafon was going to ruin the characters lives to make a point. But he makes his point with Julian and leaves Daniel to gives us a satisfied ending. There's probably nothing much I 'learned' in the introspective sense, but this is a novel like a novel ought to be.

This is an epic film on paper, gloomy and engaging, smokey, noir with crumbling ruins, young love, disfigurment, lust, torture.the stuff of Dumas, DuMauier and, as of late, The Historian. I woke up at five a.m. And had to sweet talk myself back to sleep: all I wanted to do was read. One Friday, after work, I took sanctuary in The Hotel Biron, those little tables in the dark, page There's probably nothing much I 'learned' in the introspective sense, but this is a novel like a novel ought to be. This is an epic film on paper, gloomy and engaging, smokey, noir with crumbling ruins, young love, disfigurment, lust, torture.the stuff of Dumas, DuMauier and, as of late, The Historian. I woke up at five a.m.

And had to sweet talk myself back to sleep: all I wanted to do was read. The fact is that I’ll never be able to write a real review for this book.

Here is why:1. I’m not good enough.I’m not now and I’ll never be. It doesn’t matter how many books you have read or how smart you are, you’ll never be good enough for that. You won’t be able to find exact words and it’s not just you. Only person who can is the author himself, but I think he already said everything he wanted.Don’t believe me?- “Books are mirrors - you only see in them what you already have inside you.” The fact is that I’ll never be able to write a real review for this book. Here is why:1.I’m not good enough.I’m not now and I’ll never be. It doesn’t matter how many books you have read or how smart you are, you’ll never be good enough for that.

You won’t be able to find exact words and it’s not just you. Only person who can is the author himself, but I think he already said everything he wanted.Don’t believe me?-“Books are mirrors - you only see in them what you already have inside you.”-“The moment you stop to think about whether you love someone, you've already stopped loving that person forever.”-“A story is a letter that the author writes to himself, to tell himself things that he would be unable to discover otherwise.”-“There are few reasons for telling the truth, but for lying the number is infinite.”-“In the shop we buy and sell them, but in truth books have no owner. Every book you see here has been somebody’s best friend.”Do you now?2.It’s impossible.I’ll try to describe it. It’s not the same feeling but the result is. You know that moment, or better said that feeling, when you see someone who means a lot to you and you have that beautiful feeling inside of you. Now try to describe it.

La Sombra Del Viento Epub

I know.3.And last but not least.Please allow me to quote the author:“Once, in my father's bookshop, I heard a regular customer say that few things leave a deeper mark on a reader than the first book that finds its way into his heart. Those first images, the echo of words we think we have left behind, accompany us throughout our lives and sculpt a palace in our memory to which, sooner or later — no matter how many books we read, how many worlds we discover, or how much we learn or forget — we will return.”And this is mine. After reading The Shadow of the Wind, I was left with somewhat mixed feelings. On the one hand, this is such a beautifully written book, and is in essence an ode to literature. On the other hand, there are some serious flaws which distracts from the whole experience.The best thing about the book, in my opinion, is Zafon's skill in artistic writing. It reminds me of why I love to read in the first place, and makes me wish I could write as beautiful as this. The book contains lots of memorable qu After reading The Shadow of the Wind, I was left with somewhat mixed feelings.

On the one hand, this is such a beautifully written book, and is in essence an ode to literature. On the other hand, there are some serious flaws which distracts from the whole experience.The best thing about the book, in my opinion, is Zafon's skill in artistic writing. It reminds me of why I love to read in the first place, and makes me wish I could write as beautiful as this. The book contains lots of memorable quotes as well, definitely a good thing as far as I'm concerned.So after about 50 pages in, I was ready to love this book as I seldom loved another book before. But as the story progressed, that resolution started to diminish slowly but surely.

Ironically, one the more obvious flaws is Zafon's overuse of stylistic writing. It seems like everyone acts or talks in a very elaborate manner, even in the simplest of situations, and this can really become tiresome after a while.The plot also isn't as ingenious as the hype would make you believe. Zafon does a good job creating a sense of mystery early on, and there are obvious parallels between the main character Daniel Sempere, and Julian Carax, the writer whose past he is trying to uncover. But ultimately, the stories of Daniel and Julian are seperate ones, and they just happen to interconnect with one another more by chance than by design.By far the most troublesome flaw is the way the mysteries are 'resolved'. All too often, answers are given by having some side character or another tell his or her story for pages. Nowhere is this more evident than at the end of the book, where literally every single detail is revealed in the form of a (very) long letter, even details which the writer of the letter never could have known, since she wasn't even involved in those events.

It's as if Zafon did not have a clue or the motivation to write a logical conclusion, and decided to just dump all the information in one place.With a bit more attention to actual plot and character development, this could have been one of my favourite books. Nevertheless, I still enjoyed reading the Shadow of the Wind. It's just a shame that it falls some way short of its potential. I can't believe someone actually published this book. Even worse, in my opinion is the fact that this book is on the New York Times Bestseller List.

How is this possible? It must only mean that there are a lot of people out there that think very differently from me. Don't you be one of them. Don't be fooled by this book. It is insipid, lame, and poorly written.First. The prose is so overblown that the author uses three adjectives for every single noun.

He evidently was to I can't believe someone actually published this book. Even worse, in my opinion is the fact that this book is on the New York Times Bestseller List. How is this possible? It must only mean that there are a lot of people out there that think very differently from me. Don't you be one of them.

Don't be fooled by this book. It is insipid, lame, and poorly written.First. The prose is so overblown that the author uses three adjectives for every single noun. He evidently was told that to be a writer you have to make everything as descriptive as possible, and then he decided that meant that each noun had to be modified three, always three, and only three times.

The author must have looked up every word he could in a thesaurus and chosen the one that was most obscure or had the most syllables. Who is he trying to impress? Maybe it was the translator's fault? Either way, this style is used even when describing what the ten year old character sees and says. Which brings me to my next point.Third. Every character in this book speaks with exactly the same voice.

All you hear is the authors voice, not any different characterizations. And that voice demonstrates the problems I described in my first and second points. But that's not all. There is an even worse, and definitely fatal, problem with this book.Fourth. This story was written as a mystery.

Nine years lurch by as the character slowly tries to unravel the details of the main conflict. I actually don't have a problem with this in theory. Unfortunately, after three quarters of the book, and numerous new characters, the mystery is no clearer. So what does the author do about it?

He has one of the characters write a 30 page (or so) letter to the main character telling him what really happened. The mystery is solved. The author is such a terrible writer that he can't even solve his own mystery. He has to use a cheap cop-out to clear everything up.I can't respect that. I can't believe so many other people have.Boycott the book. Fourth reading: May 7-17, 2017Of course I love this book soooo much. It's my all-time favorite.

This is the 4th year in a row I've read it, and it never gets old. If you haven't already read this at my suggestion, WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?!Third reading: May 14-21, 2016Second reading: May 23-25, 2015-Okay, I can confidently say, upon re-reading this, that it is one of my all-time favorite books. It was just as surprising and enchanting and delightful as the first time I read it, if not more so. Fourth reading: May 7-17, 2017Of course I love this book soooo much. It's my all-time favorite.

This is the 4th year in a row I've read it, and it never gets old. If you haven't already read this at my suggestion, WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?!Third reading: May 14-21, 2016Second reading: May 23-25, 2015-Okay, I can confidently say, upon re-reading this, that it is one of my all-time favorite books. It was just as surprising and enchanting and delightful as the first time I read it, if not more so. The writing is impeccable. The weaving together of so many storylines and characters is remarkable. I can't gush enough about this book, so I will just say EVERYONE GO READ THIS NOW PLEASE. You won't regret it.First read: May 12-17, 2014-Everything about this novel was captivating.

The story follows Daniel, a young boy, whose father is a bookseller. He is taken to the Cemetery of Forgotten Books and allowed to pick out one book that he is expected to 'save' or, in a sense, remember throughout his life. He picks a novel by Julian Carax titled 'The Shadow of the Wind,' and is immediately sucked into the story. From there, the novel follows Daniel as he begins to learn more about the illusive author, Julian Carax, and about the web of lies and intrigue that he gets trapped in.The writing is absolutely gorgeous.

Viento

The book is full of incredible quotes, wonderful, beautifully strung out sentences. I never underline in books. This book, however, required a pencil at the ready at all times, because I couldn't pass up underlining some amazing parts.Though the plot isn't super strong, there is a mysterious and magical quality to the book that propels you through it, page after page.

The characters feel so real, and thus their lives seem to be playing out for you in such a real way that you are concerned and invested, wanting to know what happens next.I loved the setting of Barcelona. This is also a book translated from Spanish, which is even more impressive on the part of the translator. I think the translation was incredible.Overall, this is a book that I will return to again in my life, I am sure. It is captivating and a new favorite.

Sentimental.the list of adjectives is endless. And while this book was all of these, the one thing that i will forever remember about this book is how it made me appreciate the art of storytelling. I didnt feel like i was reading a novel; i felt as if someone very dear was sitting next to me and telling me their favourite tale. I was enamoured with the nuances of the language and swept up with all the action.

It was an absolute pleasure to e riveting. Sentimental.the list of adjectives is endless.

And while this book was all of these, the one thing that i will forever remember about this book is how it made me appreciate the art of storytelling. I didnt feel like i was reading a novel; i felt as if someone very dear was sitting next to me and telling me their favourite tale. I was enamoured with the nuances of the language and swept up with all the action. It was an absolute pleasure to experience such a well-told story.

Truly a masterpiece in every way possible.↠ 4.5 stars. It's been a couple years since I read this book so I shouldn't and won't go into details, but the effect has lingered all this time. There's no other book I'm quicker to recommend than this one. It's not that it's particularly important in a lot of the ways 'important' books are, it's just that it works as pure reading pleasure (and sometimes, isn't that enough?); so I find reviews from people desperate to discover structural flaws and stylistic cliches to be totally missing the point.

Buy it ne It's been a couple years since I read this book so I shouldn't and won't go into details, but the effect has lingered all this time. There's no other book I'm quicker to recommend than this one. It's not that it's particularly important in a lot of the ways 'important' books are, it's just that it works as pure reading pleasure (and sometimes, isn't that enough?); so I find reviews from people desperate to discover structural flaws and stylistic cliches to be totally missing the point.

Buy it new, breathe in the perfume of those pages, tell your friends and family you're going to be busy for a few days and disappear into it. This is an excellent piece of literature.

It contains poetic storytelling, shocking twists, thoroughly developed characters, symbolism, humor, romance, betrayal, action, sentimentality, nostalgia, and much, much more.For book lovers it is perfect because it revolves around the mysteries of a little known author (Julian Carax) that the main protagonist, Daniel, stumbles across in a secret stash of literature called the Cemetery of Forgotten books. From there it quickly develops into a fantastic This is an excellent piece of literature. It contains poetic storytelling, shocking twists, thoroughly developed characters, symbolism, humor, romance, betrayal, action, sentimentality, nostalgia, and much, much more.For book lovers it is perfect because it revolves around the mysteries of a little known author (Julian Carax) that the main protagonist, Daniel, stumbles across in a secret stash of literature called the Cemetery of Forgotten books. From there it quickly develops into a fantastic story of good vs.

Evil; driven by jealousy and shrouded in the unknown.I saw some complaints that this book is slow. I can understand that - it is not a light book and it is not a quick read. But, the payoff from getting immersed in the thick narrative is totally worth the extra time in the end.Lovers of books, lovers of historical fiction, lovers of mysteries with shocking twists, lovers of complex romance/revenge story lines, lovers of ultimate good vs evil battles - step right in to The Cemetery of Forgotten Books. And lose yourself in The Shadow of the Wind. Look, it's not my thing to mince my words, so I'll give you my opinion and ultimately, you'll decide what to make of it anyway: as far as I'm concerned, is overrated and, to say the truth, a bit of a smokescreen. Despite its obvious qualities, I have to admit that I'm a little baffled of its status given that all the flaws, if found in some random YA book, would be called out without any doubt.✘ Caricatures as characters, from Daniel the Romantic whose const2/2.5 stars. Look, it's not my thing to mince my words, so I'll give you my opinion and ultimately, you'll decide what to make of it anyway: as far as I'm concerned, is overrated and, to say the truth, a bit of a smokescreen.

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Despite its obvious qualities, I have to admit that I'm a little baffled of its status given that all the flaws, if found in some random YA book, would be called out without any doubt.✘ Caricatures as characters, from Daniel the Romantic whose constant whining reminded me of some 18th Century hero (someone saves me from, please), to the twisting-moustache villain whose mother, you guessed right, was a crazy bitch (mwahahahaha). As for the women (OMG, the WOMEN), they're either sexual creatures (often vile and manipulative, because of course.roll eyes.) or solely conceived for the Great Goal of Bearing children (or assuming their care). It's pretty simple, actually: the good girls are those who get pregnant or are desperate for it, and all women are portrayed through their looks. All of these characters were flat and forgettable in my book.✘ Blatant sexism pouring through every page, and before you mention it, I KNOW, the society in 1945/1950 wasn't kind on women. I do know that, yet I don't believe that the portrayal of sexist behavior had to be so IN YOUR FACE. In the past I've read historical novels that let me furious about the way women were treated and categorized into little boxes (mother, virgin, whore, if you're asking) but in I never felt that the issue was handled or acknowledged, or barely (they do mention it in other men, but for me they were no better). It was just THERE.

All the time, and I'm not sure how I'm supposed to care about characters - Fermin and Daniel, for example - who constantly objectify women, when they're not busy expressing stereotypes like, 'women can't do Maths', or, 'women who let you touch them the first time are whores', etc, etc. I read the French translation, so I'm not going to write down the quotes, but they are EVERYWHERE. I felt like drowning.✘ The instalove, anyone? Far from me the intent of spoiling the story to you, so I'll just say this: there are three couples in this story, and the THREE OF THEM suffer from major instalove (the kind where people see each other once, talk twice, and share iloveyous).

What the hell?! Again, if this book was called The Storm and The Thorns, and some generic YA bullshit, it would have annoyed me, because I cannot feel invested in a romance if there's neither growth nor depth. Why in the world should I feel differently this time? I couldn't care less.✘ The resolution of the intrigue did not satisfy me, because I found the way it was revealed rather lazy.

Sure, I did not expect it, but after having remained in the dark during 80% of the book, I was a little disappointed by the avalanche of information that was thrown in my face, in a info-dumping fashion. Even with the interesting meta narration , it felt like such a cop-out.✔ The atmosphere is darkly enticing, captivating, even, and for me the real MC is Barcelona. Indeed I couldn't look away from the fascinating picture created, from the vivid slices of life put into black and white letters.

I wish the descriptions of Paris would have reached this level of brilliance, but I didn't really mind. Albeit the difficult times described, reading made me want to come back there, and I probably will very soon.✔ The writing, if not free of some cheesy figures of speech - but it could be the translation - is addictive and compelling. From the first page I was hooked, and my interest didn't falter before reaching the second half (but I already explained why).► All in all, was a disappointment for me. Perhaps my expectations were too high, but in the end, the story didn't convince me, and even the message - no matter how great it was, or wanted to be - felt a bit superficial because spoiled by the lack of depth of the characters.Shrugs.For more of my reviews, please visit. I found this novel by accident, while quickly browsing shelves at the local library, and let me just say it was the best accidental find i've had in years. From the very first line to the end i loved it, and as a reader i am not easily pleased by anything.

I love stories out of the ordinary that captivate my imagination and run away with it. That is exactly what The Shadow of The Wind did.Right off the bat the plot intrigued me, Daniel Sempere is taken to the a secret labyrinth of forgotten book I found this novel by accident, while quickly browsing shelves at the local library, and let me just say it was the best accidental find i've had in years. From the very first line to the end i loved it, and as a reader i am not easily pleased by anything. I love stories out of the ordinary that captivate my imagination and run away with it.

That is exactly what The Shadow of The Wind did.Right off the bat the plot intrigued me, Daniel Sempere is taken to the a secret labyrinth of forgotten books - the place where books are brought for their final rest after the world has forgotten their existence - and told by his father to pick one to always care for and protect. He chooses The Shadow of The Wind and his life is forever changed by his fascination with the book, its author and his determination to uncover the mystery surrounding the doomed fate of all other works by the author.What fascinated me most as Daniel started to get entangled in the mysterious web of the book and its author's history, was how Daniels life began to mirror Carax (the author of the book). The writing is almost poetic yet simple to follow and enjoy, their are subplots that run alongside the major plot so the book isn't one dimensional and boring.Overall this is a fascinating read that is sure to take you on an adventure that will make you wish there were more pages to read after you turn the last page. Highly recommended for those who are not afraid to explore other worlds or allow a book to engulf their senses completely. Trying too hard. I wonder if I hadn't read this right after Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell if I would have liked it better.

They were both trying to pay homage to the gothic/Romantic era writers, except that Strange and Norrell was brilliant, and this one was. I appreciated what the author was trying to do, but he didn't do it well enough to keep me reading. Yes, Romantic lit is full of cliche, but the thing is to do it in an intriguing way and with enough wit to keep your audience intere Trying too hard.

I wonder if I hadn't read this right after Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell if I would have liked it better. They were both trying to pay homage to the gothic/Romantic era writers, except that Strange and Norrell was brilliant, and this one was.

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I appreciated what the author was trying to do, but he didn't do it well enough to keep me reading. Yes, Romantic lit is full of cliche, but the thing is to do it in an intriguing way and with enough wit to keep your audience interested. This book did not have that balance. It had the formula, it just didn't execute things well enough, in my opinion.To be fair, that could be because this book was originally in Spanish. It could have lost a lot in translation. I know it lost something, actually, because some of the sentences are rather awkwardly phrased. But Arturo Perez-Reverte's gothic-esque novels were also in Spanish, and they still had their magic in translation.

So, I don't forgive this guy enough to finish the book. Which I didn't, by the way. Got about halfway through because I was hoping it would get better, but it was still not grabbing me, so. Onto the next! The writing is along Dan Brown lines, with flowery metaphors mixed until they become meaningless. From page 1: 'My father sighed, hiding behind the sad smile that followed him like a shadow all through his life.' How can he be hiding behind it if it's following him?

Then on the next page someone is described as having 'vulturine features', but in the following sentence he has an 'aquiline gaze'. This sloppiness is everywhere.The whole thing feels like it desperately wants be seen as some k Dire. The writing is along Dan Brown lines, with flowery metaphors mixed until they become meaningless. From page 1: 'My father sighed, hiding behind the sad smile that followed him like a shadow all through his life.' How can he be hiding behind it if it's following him? Then on the next page someone is described as having 'vulturine features', but in the following sentence he has an 'aquiline gaze'.

This sloppiness is everywhere.The whole thing feels like it desperately wants be seen as some kind of profound parable, but the only result is that the characters are just implausible symbols. They are too bland even to hate – unlike the book itself, which I loathed. Here is one for those of us who absolutely adore great literature. It is almost as though The Shadow of the Wind was written for book lovers everywhere. An adrenaline laced, pulse pounding, suspense filled, dark and romantic, gothic adventure, peopled with brilliantly developed, colourful, charismatic and ultimately,unforgetable characters. It really should come with a warning as it will keep you reading late into the night and long after you should have put it down. A must read folksHere is one for those of us who absolutely adore great literature.

It is almost as though The Shadow of the Wind was written for book lovers everywhere. An adrenaline laced, pulse pounding, suspense filled, dark and romantic, gothic adventure, peopled with brilliantly developed, colourful, charismatic and ultimately,unforgetable characters. It really should come with a warning as it will keep you reading late into the night and long after you should have put it down. A must read folks. Make room on your book shelves for this one.

This book SEEMED like it was going to be so good - a dark mystery set in post-war Barcelona, with tragic love and a place called The Cemetary of Forgotton Books. What's not to love? (To be honest, I'm not a fan of tragic love, but everything else at least seemed great). But while I was vaguely curious to see how everything pieced together, I didn't like or care about any of the characters, and dialogue like 'Sometimes I no longer know who you are,' kept me at a distance. The book never went be This book SEEMED like it was going to be so good - a dark mystery set in post-war Barcelona, with tragic love and a place called The Cemetary of Forgotton Books. What's not to love? (To be honest, I'm not a fan of tragic love, but everything else at least seemed great).

But while I was vaguely curious to see how everything pieced together, I didn't like or care about any of the characters, and dialogue like 'Sometimes I no longer know who you are,' kept me at a distance. The book never went beyond just seeming like a book I would like, and I kept wanting to like it a lot more than I did. DNF'd on page 221In theory, I should have loved this book. Structurally and plot-wise it reads sort of like a Spanish version of The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt, but I just didn't connect with this story or the writing. Since I was still curious to see how the book ends, I read the plot summary on Wikipedia (I know, I'm terrible) and after doing that I'm glad I decided to stop reading. The book certainly goes in a direction that I didn't see coming, but I don't think it would be worth slogging th DNF'd on page 221In theory, I should have loved this book. Structurally and plot-wise it reads sort of like a Spanish version of The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt, but I just didn't connect with this story or the writing.

Since I was still curious to see how the book ends, I read the plot summary on Wikipedia (I know, I'm terrible) and after doing that I'm glad I decided to stop reading. The book certainly goes in a direction that I didn't see coming, but I don't think it would be worth slogging through another 200+ pages. This was definitely a case of me not being the right reader for this particular book, so by no means take this review as a reason not to give it a try! The atmosphere of Barcelona was great, but that was the only part of this book that really spoke to me.VERY UNPOPULAR OPINION TIME.The majority of my friends love this book to death but I didn't. Some of my friends didn't love it so I don't feel so alone thank goodness.I tried reading the paperback awhile back and put it down. Then I picked it up again and the beginning was so good. I thought we were going to go on some kind of crazy journey when I read about the cemetery of forgotten books.

It just never went where I thought it might go.I finally got the audio version on Overdrive and.VERY UNPOPULAR OPINION TIME.The majority of my friends love this book to death but I didn't. Some of my friends didn't love it so I don't feel so alone thank goodness.I tried reading the paperback awhile back and put it down. Then I picked it up again and the beginning was so good. I thought we were going to go on some kind of crazy journey when I read about the cemetery of forgotten books.

It just never went where I thought it might go.I finally got the audio version on Overdrive and the narrator was wonderful, the little music parts while reading were wonderful, I just couldn't get into it.I really don't think it was my mood either even though I'm fighting a reading slump. I just didn't care for any of the characters or what was going on.

It's a shame but I can't love them all, but I am glad for those that do love the book =). Where do I begin? This is by far my favourite book of the year so far and I have already bought the second in the series so I can quench my obsession with Carlos Ruiz Zafon's gorgeous writing.The story begins in Barcelona just after the Spanish Civil War, a young boy named Daniel lives alone with his Father and helps run the family bookshop. One day Daniel's Father takes him to a place knows as 'The Cemetery of Forgotten Books' - a labyrinthine place completely packed with beautiful and rare boo Where do I begin? This is by far my favourite book of the year so far and I have already bought the second in the series so I can quench my obsession with Carlos Ruiz Zafon's gorgeous writing.The story begins in Barcelona just after the Spanish Civil War, a young boy named Daniel lives alone with his Father and helps run the family bookshop.

One day Daniel's Father takes him to a place knows as 'The Cemetery of Forgotten Books' - a labyrinthine place completely packed with beautiful and rare books. Daniel is allowed to spend some time there and pick out one book that he can to keep, this is how he come across 'The Shadow of the Wind' - a gripping novel written by one Julian Carax.After falling in love with the book Daniel sets out on a mission to find out more about it's illusive author, he also discovers that a mysterious cloaked figure is hell bent on destroying any remaining books by Julian Carax, including the one that Daniel now owns.

We are then thrown into an epic adventure with twists and turns at every corner, Zafon tells such a brilliantly thought out story that you won't want to put down!The themes explored in this novel are too many to list but some more prominent ones include; forbidden love, murder, adultery and family ties. Zafon spins such a intricate tale that won't fail to surprise! I laughed, I cried and also found myself longing to be working alongside Daniel as he uncovers the mysteries surrounding 'The Shadow of the Wind'.Zafon's writing has to be one of the most beautiful I have ever read.

I was constantly finding myself sitting back from the book just to take in the profound nature of what was written on the page. Foreboding“I still remember the day my father took me to the Cemetery of Forgotten Books for the first time. It was the early summer of 1945, 'Daniel you mustn’t tell anyone what you’re about to see today’ my father warned.” The wonderful opening line that sets the scene for an eerie and mysterious story waiting to unfold over the next 400 pages. A captivating foreboding story that changes the air around you as you read.The tradition for those that are fortunate to visit the 'Cemetery of For Foreboding“I still remember the day my father took me to the Cemetery of Forgotten Books for the first time. It was the early summer of 1945, 'Daniel you mustn’t tell anyone what you’re about to see today’ my father warned.” The wonderful opening line that sets the scene for an eerie and mysterious story waiting to unfold over the next 400 pages. A captivating foreboding story that changes the air around you as you read.The tradition for those that are fortunate to visit the 'Cemetery of Forgotten Books' for the first time, is that they get to choose and adopt a book.

Daniel on his first visit chooses ‘Shadow of the Wind’ by Julian Carax, or the book chooses him. Daniel along with his father, his father’s friend Barcelo and his niece Clara, investigate what happened to the author, only to realise that this is a mysterious and heart-breaking story and this book that Daniel owns may be the last surviving version of ‘Shadow of the Wind’. Their research uncovers the dramatic events that befell Julain Carax and his beloved Penelope.Years’ later, one night walking through a misty Barcelona, a mysterious rasping voice calls Daniel from the shadows and offers any amount of money for the book. By match-light, Daniel sees a burnt, grotesque, and mutilated face telling him he wants the book, and for his sake and the sake of his friend Clara he better give it to him.

What does he want to do with it? He asks “'Burn them' he whispers”.Needless to say, Daniel keeps the book and searches for the history and truth behind it and its author. It is a wonderfully written story with subtle complexities and layers, leaving the reader feeling a blanket of chilling apprehension as you urge Daniel forward to uncover the good, the bad and the retribution surrounding Carax. The characters offer depth and range, and you’re not quite sure what intentions are genuine and where your sympathies will lie at the end. The hot, misty, atmospheric Barcelona is extremely well characterised and adds to the suspense and mystery.One of my favourite books of all time.

This is the first of a trilogy along with Angels Game and The Prisoner of Heaven. It is also the best! This novel started off very promising, but soon devolved into bad writing and ridiculous plotting.

I finally had to abandon it after 200 pages because I didn't want to waste another minute on it. I'm going to give the writer the benefit of the doubt and wonder if this was poorly translated from the Spanish.The story is set in Barcelona in 1945. What I liked about the beginning was the idea of a young boy being drawn into a secret world of readers.

Daniel was 10 when his father took him to the C This novel started off very promising, but soon devolved into bad writing and ridiculous plotting. I finally had to abandon it after 200 pages because I didn't want to waste another minute on it. I'm going to give the writer the benefit of the doubt and wonder if this was poorly translated from the Spanish.The story is set in Barcelona in 1945. What I liked about the beginning was the idea of a young boy being drawn into a secret world of readers. Daniel was 10 when his father took him to the Cemetery of Forgotten Books, which was a dusty and hidden library, and he was told to choose one book to protect.

Daniel fell in love with an out-of-print novel and tries to find out more about the mysterious author.' Once, in my father's bookshop, I heard a regular customer say that few things leave a deeper mark on a reader than the first book that finds its way into his heart. Those first images, the echo of words we think we have left behind, accompany us throughout our lives and sculpt a palace in our memory to which, sooner or later - no matter how many books we read, how many worlds we discover, or how much we learn or forget - we will return. For me those enchanted pages will always be the ones I found among the passageways of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books.' Daniel soon finds out that the book he chose is valuable because it is the very last copy - all the others have been burned.

There's no point in summarizing the rest of the plot because it quickly becomes absurd. Absurdity is always relative, of course, and the degree to which disbelief must be suspended varies by genre. This book was grounded at the beginning, but the mystery aspect was so silly that it became farcical.I had high hopes for this novel but was very disappointed. I thought it might be similar to the modern gothic style of 'The Thirteenth Tale,' which I really liked, but the bad writing made me quickly tire of it.

There were too many cliches, too many florid descriptions and too many long speeches from preposterous characters.Looking at reviews from GR friends, I see everything from 1 stars to 5 stars on this book. It is possible that if I come back to this at another time and in another mood, I may like it more, but for now, it's just OK.

The Shadow of the Windis a literary thriller set in Barcelona in the first half of the 20th century, from the fading splendour of Modernism to the shadowy post-war world. The Shadow of the Wind has elements of mystery, historical, and comedy of manner genres but it is most of all a tragic love story which echoes through time. With great narrative power, the author reveals plots and intrigues as though opening up a Russian doll in an unforgettable tale about the secrets of the heart and the magic of books, maintaining the mystery until the last page.

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